About Dumlupinar University

Dumlupinar University

Articles by Dumlupinar University

The efficacy of complex Decongestive Physiotherapy in patients with Bilateral Primary Lower Extremity Lymphedema and Untreatable multiple health conditions: A Case Report

Published on: 8th September, 2017

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7286355299

Background: Primary lymphedema occurs as a result of genetic abnormalities of the lymph system. Currently, complex decongestive therapy is accepted as the standard treatment of the lymphedema. In this case presentation, we described the management of bilateral primary lower extremity lymphedema and the use of complex decongestive therapy. Case Report: A 62 years old female patient had stage III primary lymphedema on her left lower extremity and stage II primary lymphedema on her right lower extremity. The patient, who had morbid obesity, also had untreatable sleep apnea, urinary incontinence, umbilical hernia and hypertension controlled by drugs. She had stage 4 gonarthrosis according to Kellgren – Lawrence classification in her both knees. The patient received complex decongestive therapy as an outpatient. After 27 sessions of complex decongestive therapy, edema reduced in both lower extremities. Before the treatment started, the patient couldn’t go up and down stairs, get out and had difficulty mobility in the home. But after the treatment, the patient could go up and down 16 stairs by holding the railing, get out by two walking sticks and had less difficulty mobility in the home. However, due to gonarthrosis in her knees, her pain did not diminish. Conclusion: Complex decongestive therapy is effective in the management of bilateral primary lower extremity lymphedema, which progressed with multiple health conditions.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat

Facial Paralysıs During Varicella Zoster Infectıon in a child

Published on: 23rd March, 2017

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 7317595686

Introduction: Primary infection with varicella-zoster virus (VZV) results in chickenpox, characterized by viremia with a diffuse rash and seeding of multiple sensory ganglia, where the virus establishes lifelong latency. Herpes zoster is caused by reactivation of latent VZV in cranial-nerve or dorsal-root ganglia, with spread of the virus along the sensory nerve to the dermatome. Both entities have a benign clinical course in immunocompetent and young individuals. Although Herpes zoster virüs may result in Ramsey Hunt sendrom, it may rarely cause peripheral facial paralysis in the course of varicella. Case report: A 4-year-old girl patient was admitted to the ear, nose, and throat clinic with a complaint of a rash over the body with vesicles and pustules a few days. She had left peripheral facial palsy about 2 days ago. In a general clinical examination, a few macular lesions, probably residues of vesicles, and fluid-filled blisters and pustules were observed on the back, chest, abdomen, upper, and lower limbs. She had remarkable left peripheral facial palsy. Her facial palsy was assessed as a grade II using the House-Brackmann Score. Otoscopic examination was normal and otalgia and auricular vesicle was absent. 1 mg/kg/day prednisone and 30 mg/kg/day acyclovir therapy were given to the patient due to the peripheral facial nerve palsy involvement of the VZV infection. Complete remission was achieved at 1 month after treatment. Conclusion: Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is one of eight herpes viruses known to cause human infection and is distributed worldwide. While the results of bell palsy are good, facial paralysis results during viral infections are severe. Cranial nerve involvement secondary to viral infection should be followed closely. The current standard of care for treatment is acyclovir and prednisone. Thus early treatment can be started in the face of developing complications and possible mortality and morbidity can be prevented.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat